The Yellow

– experimental dance performance –

Ukrainian Institute of America in New York

(08.18 / 2008)

Credits:

Svitlana Matviyenko – concept, dramaturgy, animation, video, photography

Inka Juslin – choreography, concept, dance

Ronja Verkasalo – dance

music: 3 Songs without Words, Part III: There is a solitude of space (2001) and Kolomyika, a dance (1981) by Virko Baley

sound – www.freesound.com

 It is a collaborative multimedia performance, featuring two dancers and a visual artist. By telling the story of an imaginary woman, dwelling in this building, Juslin’s choreography accentuates the architectural features of the Gothic mansion.It is a collaborative multimedia performance, featuring two dancers and a visual artist. By telling the story of an imaginary woman, dwelling in this building, Juslin’s choreography accentuates the architectural features of the Gothic mansion. The work asks how a strict division between public and private within one’s home affects one’s life there.

Space

How can architecture be embodied in dance? Our intention is to not merely reinvent characters that lived in the mansion, but to animate and choreograph the different flows of movement reflecting desire, pain, hesitation, struggle and excitement. Each room of the building has its private and public dimension, which means, it has a couple of different stories to tell. Our choreography presents the duality of each room, their real and virtual realms, fused in our experience of space. Two other “folds” of space—exterior and interior—are not easy to distinguish. First of all, they exist only in relation to each other. Second, each of them carries its own exteriority and interiority. Our choreography grows from the intersection of these two dimensions of space—the inside and the outside. It shows how we simultaneously exist in both. In other words, this performance reminds us of what our body knows, even though we are not entirely aware of it.

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Time

And now we are in the dimension of time…It was Eadweard Muybridge whose experiments with capturing the images of running, flying and walking animals and humans “folded” the movement into one tiny piece of a film frame. This was where space shrank into time. It could be a minute or two that we devote to viewing a short loop of animation during the performance. It has been a hundred and thirty years since Muybridge accomplished his experiment. Our short animation bridges the present and the past: a contemporary dancer meets Muybridge’s nude model in a privacy of a room. This performance brings together the actual movement embodied by dancers and the virtual movement recomposed from the traces of digital recording. How different is the time of different media? What are the old media and new media, if the computer animation still repeats the experiment of Muybridge?

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